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UNESCO HIV and Health Education Clearinghouse

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  1. Inquiétudes féminines: reportage de femmes sur la violence basée sur le genre

    This booklet deals with various aspects of gender-based violence (domestic violence, sexual abuse, legislation and policies etc.) as seen by female journalists.

  2. Gender Inequalities in primary Schooling: The roles of poverty and adverse cultural practice

    This paper suggests a simple model for the relationships between poverty, schooling and gender inequality. It argues that poverty at both national and household levels is associated with an under-enrolment of school age children, but that the gendered outcomes of such under enrolment are the product of cultural practice, rather than poverty per se. Using detailed case study material from two African countries, evidence is presented to show the variety and extent of adverse cultural practice which impede the attendance and performance of girls at school, relative to boys. …

  3. Decision Analysis and Interpretation Worksheet: Social Determinants.

    This worksheet discusses the scale of the problem of gender bias towards women in the African sub-saharan region. This is in relation to vulnerability to HIV/AIDS infection and how this can be mitigated most effectively.

  4. Dangerous game of love? Challenging male machismo

    This paper examines data for 30 Xhosa youth aged 16 to 24 from township schools in South Africa. Major findings focus on the pervasive nature of violence for young people today: beating is the normative response in their homes, at schools and in their relationships. Masculinity is defined by th number of sex partners, choice of main partner and ability to control girlfriends. Feminity is based on girls desirability to the opposite sex. Concludes with suggestions for policy changes, emphasizing the need for government to promote accountability for its behaviour.

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